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regulation. >> what impact, if any, do you think that the changes in california and their method for electing congressional representatives will have? >> are you referring to the redistricting? >> yes. democrat versus democrat, republican versus republican in their system of electing. >> if i am understanding your right, you are referring to -- now there was a kind of bipartisan commission that redesigned -- that did the redistricting. now, i actually did a story for the atlantic monthly on redistricting. i had mentioned this thing. there has been -- the belief by many politicians is that there is no such thing as a bipartisan board are nonpartisan board. they often times point to the california commission as a failed experiment because the democrats had menace to influence a series of e-mails obtained by pro public of which suggest that was the minister and floods a lot of these. having said that there are a number of other states in the u.s. that do have bipartisan redistricting commissions. and just for what it's worth another reason why this is a salient topic is that i am often asked, if
as the great plains, the rocky mountains and then west of the rocky mountains to california. didn't include california because california has you know was already a state. question was so critical because it had to do with the future of slavery, and the future of southern power in the nation. now, southerners demanded what they saw as their constitutional rights as american citizens to take their property, including slave property, into territories owned by the entire nation. in 1857, in the famous or infamous dred scott decision, the united states supreme court affirmed this southern constitutional view. republicans in contrast said never. no matter the supreme court. republicans would allow moral -- no more slaves in any territory. abraham lincoln was elected in november of 1860. a month later the united states congress came into session. members of congress put forth various compromise proposals, a critical portion of all in some way dealt with the division of the territories. most often there was a proposal to extend some kind of a dividing line western beyond the louisiana purchase all
and southern california and arizona and north carolina are informed in the post-world war two period by this historic shift in population and political influence and it is pogo from 1964 to 2008 could be thought of as the period of the sun belt dominance in american presidential history. you think about every president elected from 1964 to 2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson, nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected so he doesn't count. jimmy carter, ronald reagan from california, the first george bush from texas, bill clinton from arkansas and the second bush from texas since 2008 is a watershed election. there were critical of the politics that the flood that came out of the sun belt. they tended to be oriented around issues of strong national defense of an opposition to the union and the defense of the free enterprise politics. and also it's in the sun belt in the south and the southwest that we see the rise by the 1970's to talk about is the religious right's involved in the political process in the new and important ways. so he was at the forefron
with the soviet union. states like georgia and texas and florida and other california and north carolina were all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift of influence. from 1964 until 2008, it was a period of sun belt dominance. if you think about every president elected from 1994 until 2008, comes from the state of the sun belt. richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected, he was never even elected vice president. so there you go. jimmy carter, ronald reagan, bill clinton from arkansas and bush from texas. the 2008, it ends with forty-year period. and there were issues that were critical into politics that came out of the sun belt. also, it is on the sun belt and in the south and southwest that we see the lives by the 1970s
, georgia, texas and southern california and arizona and north carolina are all transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. the latest period from 1964 to 2008 could be thought of this kind of the period of sun belt dominance in american presidential history. you think about every president elected from 1964 to 2008 comes from the state on the sun belt. when johnson from texas, richard nixon from california. gerald ford was never elected, so he doesn't count. jimmy carter from georgia, ronald reagan from california. the first george bush via connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas and the second question texas. so too does the natives and so ways a watershed election. it ends the 40 year. the sun belt dominance. their issues critical in the politics that developed that came out of the sun belt. they didn't have a conservative cast of them. they tended to be oriented about issues of strong national defense, and opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics. and also is in the south and sou
to missouri and texas to california. she helped out banks when times were bad and they were in trouble. she was the largest individual lender to the new york city government. she lived in the gilded age when society lived lavishly and she rebelled against their opulence. she lived a simple life. she loved her children and her friends. she was of those who befriended her for her money and she showed her dog great affection and when asked why, she said -- [inaudible] [laughter] she forged a path for women to be able to have careers. she showed that women were the equal of any man. newspapers around the world, they proclaimed her the queen of wall street. it was known throughout that she was the richest woman in america. so there are lots of sayings in the back of the book and words of wisdom. she did have a good sense of humor and she was one smart lady. if you have any questions, i would love to try and answer. >> would you find any evidence of her support? >> nine. she said women should not have the right to vote. margaret thatcher did leave and not either. vera can't even believe in it. it
town meetings and apples. we can of oranges in some other process in california to people can take the inspiration and use it from wherever they are to the democratic possibility rises up locally and hopefully i think in some ways that can have an impact on the national conversation. >> here we go. >> and 73 from the historical society. if a sub for a librarian and were in the vault of history center in vermont. we've got a photo album created by george houghton, a vermonter who went down to view and take pictures of burbach troops are in civil war. he presented this album to us in 1863 after he returned from his third trip to virginia, taking pictures mostly of vermonters that camp, but also other scenes that he saw. one of the scenes that often reproduced as this one of a family of slaves again tieless. right below it is a photograph of soffa vermont officers. >> some of the other pictures showed been batteries they were using that were involved in this. there are photos here show in the aftermath at the burial ground of the soldiers. those photos get used a lot. there's a batter
for the big items to come up, currently there is an initiative in california launched by the american bar association to promote the international criminal court and to get the u.s. to join the international criminal court and they are paying for members of the court to come here and meet with american judges. they see this as a long-term process. this is a long-term thing even after they die they hope this is a goal that they will someday reach and we should look at that in protecting the american republic and sometimes it is disturbing to people on our side that says, i mean those that would like to see the american republic survive as long as it possibly can. nothing is forever, so this republic is also not going to last forever. i don't know if that is true because we don't know the future and i will stick with john adams it's rare to last forever and i went to try to make it that way. [applause] >> you are watching book tv on c-span2. joining us now in the studio is malcolm, the founder and the chairman of the foundation of the american writers museum. very quickly, what is the ameri
things that money can't buy. if you're sentenced to a jail term in santa barbara, california -- just in case that happens to any one of you -- [laughter] you should know that if you don't like the standard accommodations, you can buy a prison cell upgrade. laugh -- [laughter] it's true. for how much, do you suppose? how much do you think it costs? >> $5,000? it's on a nightly basis. $90 a night. or if you're a tourist, suppose you go to washington, d.c., you want to sit in on a congressional hearing, but there may be a very long line if it's a popular hearing, and you might like standing on long lines. you can now go to a company called line-standing.com -- [laughter] pay them a certain amount of money. they will hire someone -- usually a homeless person or someone who needs the work -- to hold the place online for hours and hours, overnight if need be, and when the hearing begins, you can take your place in the line and go into the hearing room. the same thing, you can do the same thing, by the way, if you want to sit in on an oral argument before the u.s. supreme court. linestandin
for our guest here in miami is patricia in cottonwood, california. patricia, you're on booktv. go ahead with your question or comment for neil barofsky. .. >> guest: well, first of all, thank you. that really feels great. you know, writing a book like this, it's a challenge writing about the bailout, and what i really tried to do was to make it accessible and understandable, and when i had the job in washington, special inspector general, that was the montra. i called it t.a.r.p. 101, it was put out so the american taxpayers, those paying for the program could really understand what was going on. it was the goal so it feels particularly good to hear the really kind comments that you just said. as far as the next book, i'm sort of recovering from this book. i really did it as a first time author, i did enjoy the process, and i really -- it was something that was, you know, you never know when you go on add veepture or journey in producing a book what it will be like, i am interested in writing something else, but i have not seen the topic to sink teeth into, but i want to write a seg boo
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10

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